Posts Tagged ‘image’

Do Latinas dress too sexy for their own good?

Wednesday, April 6th, 2011

mariela-with-jacket1

    In a recent post on the Latinos in College Facebook page we asked if Latinas dress too sexy for the workforce or for a professional environment. It was interesting to read our fans reactions. Here’s a sample:
    “We have curvy figures and everything just looks great on us!” – Carmen Guerrero“

    “I think we just have great taste and “consequently” what we choose to wear accentuates our bodies… I mean when I watch Good Morning America on NBC and Despierta America on Univision I’m like there is no comparison. Latinos are looking fresh all the time.” Faustino Hernanez

    “I think it’s just the shape of our bodies. I can wear something really baggy and you can still see my curves.” Vikki.

    Yes, Latinas tend to be curvier and pay more attention to their appearance. (Full disclosure: I wore lipstick to the ER a few weeks back!) But that doesn’t mean that they are always dressing appropriately when it comes to the workplace or any professional environment. This is true not just for Latinas but for many young ladies who have some difficulties distinguishing what kind of clothes to wear for different occasions. If you don’t have female role models who work in a professional setting, it can be a challenge to figure it all out on your own.

    Here are a few pointers that might help.

  • 1. Use the heavy makeup for a night out. For a job interview, an internship or a professional conference, try a more discreet do. The same goes for your accessories. The principle here is “less is more.”
  • 2. Skirts should be to your knees or below. Not above. Favor those that are not too tight so that the shape of your butt doesn’t become part of the conversation once you walk away. Choose skirts that are either a solid color or subtle prints. And fabrics that are not see through or lacey.
  • 3. Blouses or shirts should not show cleavage, they should fit you nicely but not too snuggly. Again, choose solids over busy prints and favor fabrics that are not see through, shiny, or have inscriptions. Do you really want a contact who could be your future boss read: “You say bitch like is a bad thing” printed on the back of your shirt?
  • 4. Wear a bra even when you don’t need one.
  • 5. Wear stockings whenever possible. Even in 2011 bear legs are still too informal for most professional environments.
  • 6. Choose your shoes carefully. You want to wear pumps with a regular heel (about 3 inches.) We all know you’ll be on the next season of Dancing with the Stars, but for this occasion, it’s better to leave your dancing shoes at home.
  • 7. If you wear a pant-suit (or pants and a jacket), chose slacks that are not stretchy and this includes any clothes you’d use to exercise, or go on a stroll with your mom on a Sunday morning. No thighs, no leggings, no palazzo made of stretchy cotton, or velour, no sweatpants, you get the picture.
  • 8. If you look awesome in a dress with a jacket, go for it! Nobody said you had to wear a suit. As long as the dress is not a little tiny summery thing, with spaghetti straps… Then we’re back to: leave it in your closet for that date you have coming up next weekend.
  • 9. And while we are talking about pasta, no tops with spaghetti straps that adhere to your body like a suede glove.

    The secret is to embrace your figure, find clothes that fit well but not too tightly, that highlight your best features and make you look elegant and project the image of a leader. When I have to dress for a business meeting, I always find a way to show my personality, either with some unique accessories, or wearing an unusual jacket that still looks professional.

    It’s not only about feeling confident and great in the clothes you choose, it’s also about what others perceive when they see you. So, when you look at yourself in the mirror ask yourself: “If a woman came to me looking like this, would I trust her to lead others? Would I assign her responsibilities? Would I coach her to grow in the company because I see potential in her?” These questions will help you look at your appearance differently.

    In an increasingly diversified workplace, it is to be expected that eventually, people will be more open to Latinas flashier style, but this shift hasn’t happened yet, so if you want to have as many opportunities open to you as you deserve, you will have to do some adjusting. I’m not suggesting that you become someone you are not. Only that you don’t let your clothes do all the talking before you even open your mouth and let the world know how smart you are.

Everything impacts your image

Saturday, October 3rd, 2009
    restaurant-en-palermo-soho-2-med1

Sometimes it’s hard to control every detail of your professional life: how you dress and communicate, your work ethic, your friends, the way you execute a project… Because the truth is that everything you do and even what you don’t do has an impact on your image.

Take for example a conference I attended this week. (I’m not going to say its name, hoping the organizers learn from the feedback and, either substantially improve the event next year or forget about the conference altogether.)

I signed up (and paid) mainly because of the keynote speaker. Yet, when I arrived (first at the wrong destination because the publicity materials were not clear) I was informed that the speaker had been canceled. “He wasn’t well known by the Latinos who were attending and he charged a lot of money so we decided to use the money to attract more people to come to the conference,” I was told by the organizer. I was furious and disappointed. It had been a very difficult morning for me and I had made the effort to attend because I wanted to hear the now-canceled-keynote speaker.

The conference was supposed to start at 9:00 but it didn’t get started until 10:00 and then they kept changing the workshops that were being offered and the rooms where they would take place. Even the host didn’t seem to have a script for the conference to flow smoothly.

In addition, the luncheon speaker was a Latino comedian. He was funny, sure, and I love a good belly laugh, but the truth is that this was an all day professional conference for which all of the attendees had sacrificed time at work and many had traveled from across the country. Instead of perpetuating the stereotype that Latinos are only about having fun, providing some solid content would’ve been a much better idea.

So, even though the topic of the conference was very relevant, the poor execution impacted the image of the organizers. It not only said something about their lack of professionalism but it also said something about how they viewed the audience. It told participants that, at some level, the organizers believed that because the audience was mainly Latino, they would be patient with the fact that the program was running an hour late, or with the various changes, or with the level of informality or with a canceled keynote speaker.

Making these kinds of assumptions can really hurt your image and your relationship with others. So here’s my advice: whatever you do, do it professionally or don’t do it. And keep in mind that informality is a trait many Latinos share but that it will get in the way of your career development in the American market. In addition, treating people with respect should always be a top priority.

Watch your image

Friday, December 19th, 2008

Photo by María Fernanda Hubeaut

      Image is everything. People see you and the materials you present (your resume, your business card and even your Linkedin page and picture) as a reflection of who you are. If you are dressed professionally and hand out a clean, mistake-free resume you will project one image. If you show up at an interview with wrinkle clothes and fingers covered with ink-stains you will project a different one.

      The same goes for your pages on Internet. If you keep a Facebook or My Space page, make sure you use pictures and post text that doesn’t compromise your professional image because employers are Googling employees before they make a job offer.
      And if you use pictures in your professional life, please update them often enough that you resemble the person in the picture. It’s surprising how many people who present as part of their job use pictures that are twenty years old. They don’t realize how bad it looks when they are on the stage presenting and that picture is on the program or on a giant screen right next to them. (Once at a conference, I was trying to connect with an author and I couldn’t find him anywhere. I was using the picture on the back cover of his latest book as a reference. When somebody finally introduced me to him, I quickly realized why I hadn’t “found” him! He looked nothing like his picture.)
      If your visual image is important in your career, nothing compares to the work that a professional photographer can do for you. The picture you see above is from a recent photo session with my photographer María Fernanda Hubeaut to update my pictures which were only three years old. Check her website to see her incredible work. www.mfhubeaut.com/studio